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Nature Nurtures; It's Time We Nurture Nature Back

We’re all part of one ecosystem, and it’s time we break free and evolve from this destructive ego-system and do our part in nurturing nature back.


Nature has been nurturing us for millennia. As humans, we have always and will continue to be dependent on nature and our environments to nurture and sustain us. We rise with the sun, we eat off the land, we make shelter of bricks, stones and trees. We need water, air, light and nourishment to survive, we need clean water, fresh air, mineral rich nourishment and circadian attuned light to thrive.


Biological diversity — or biodiversity for short — is the variety of life on Earth, in all its forms. Healthy ecosystems and rich biodiversity are fundamental to life on Earth. A changing climate means changing habitats and biodiversity loss. According to the UNDP, the biodiversity we see today is the result of 4.5 billion years of evolution, increasingly influenced by humans. This continuing loss of biodiversity will undermine our ability to strive for poverty reduction, food and water security, human health, and the overall goal of leaving no one behind.

Biodiversity is interconnected, intertwined, and indivisible life on Earth, including human life. Our societies, livelihoods, economies and overall well being depend on healthy and functioning ecosystems. There can be no stable climate or sustainable development without biodiversity.


With that in mind, the 15th Conference of Parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity COP15 held in Montreal earlier this month, facilitated a push forward towards forging a peace pact with nature. The “Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework” (GBF), which includes four goals and 23 targets for achievement by 2030.


The main points include:

  • Protecting 30% of Earth’s lands, oceans, coastal areas, and inland waters.

  • Reducing annual harmful government subsidies by $500 billion.

  • Cutting food waste in half.

  • Maintaining, enhancing and restoring ecosystems, including halting species extinction and maintaining genetic diversity.

  • "Sustainable use" of biodiversity - essentially ensuring that species and habitats can provide the services they provide for humanity, such as food and clean water.

  • Ensuring that the benefits of resources from nature, like medicines that come from plants, are shared fairly and equally and that indigenous peoples' rights are protected

  • Paying for and putting resources into biodiversity: Ensuring that money and conservation efforts get to where they are needed.


We have a symbiotic relationship with nature: we benefit from it, and we in turn need to take care of it. We’re all part of one ecosystem, and it’s time we break free and evolve from this destructive ego-system and do our part in nurturing nature back.




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